Opinions

The Evolution from Little Sister to Big Sister

Photo courtesy of Olivia Cantarella'18

Photo courtesy of Olivia Cantarella’18

Everyone at IHA knows that once you become a junior, you are no longer a “little sister,” and are now an upperclassmen. But what does this really mean in relation to the life of a typical IHA girl? In mine, it meant building on and strengthening valuable qualities such as wisdom, gratitude, and responsibility.

Walking into IHA as a freshman, I did not know what to expect. I knew that high school would be harder than freshman year, and I would learn new things; that was it. As a little sister, I needed someone to show me the ropes of how to succeed at IHA. I was vulnerable, and clueless. It was almost as if I was a newborn puppy opening its eyes for the first time in a world that is so unfamiliar to them. When I first discovered that I would have a “big sister,” I was so excited, as I saw this as my opportunity to discover everything I could about how to survive at IHA. In addition, I only have an older brother as a sibling. I saw this as a chance to finally get the older sister I never had.

Photo courtesy of Olivia Cantarella'18

Photo courtesy of Olivia Cantarella’18

When “Big Sister, Little Sister” day finally arrived, I was ecstatic. I can clearly recall being so eager to go to school that day. I dreamed of what my locker would look like, what my big sister would be like, and how the day would go. I remember looking down freshman hallway, being overwhelmed with the amount of pink, candy, and balloons I saw. It fully exceeded any expectations I had for the day.

As the day continued and I finally met with my “big sister,” I remember being overcome with the feeling of relief. I felt that I had more of a direction of what I would get involved with at IHA, and how I would handle the rigorous amount of work assigned.

As I continued on my high school journey through freshman and sophomore year, I faced many challenges personally, academically, and socially. Every IHA girl goes through these tough times, but I felt that I was learning how to deal with these difficulties in a responsible manor.

With every mistake I made, I knew that it was helping me to develop into a better person.

Photo courtesy of Olivia Cantarella'18

Photo courtesy of Olivia Cantarella’18

On the last day of sophomore year, I remember feeling so accomplished. I knew that the hard times were behind me, and the future was bright. I was ready to be an upperclassman, and share my experiences with my “little sister”.

Starting on the first day of junior year, as I would pass the freshman and sophomores in the hallway, I thought about how I used to be in their shoes. I experienced their struggles, but the difference was that as a junior I now knew how to help them. As “Big Sister, Little Sister” day was approaching, I was determined to be the best “big sister,” as I knew how much the day meant to me. I was ready to open up to my “little sister,” and give her all the advice I could.

The day was full of smiles, as my “little sister” and I shared laughs and precious quality time. With every question she asked me, I knew that I now had the answer. I now had the wisdom from my own life experiences to help her succeed.

Photo courtesy of Olivia Cantarella'18

Photo courtesy of Olivia Cantarella’18

That is when it hit me: being a “big sister” is more then just a title. Being a “big sister” speaks to your character. It shows that you are a strong, confident, independent girl that is prepared to achieve anything you set your mind to.

Personally, throughout the years as a “little sister,” I evolved into a new person. I am grateful for everything that has happened to me: the good, the bad, and the in-between.

Why you might ask? Because at the end of the day, I feel that I am prepared for anything life throws my way. I know that I have loving friends and family to guide me along the way, and that is a gift from God.

I have truly learned the true meaning of sisterhood, and will continue to do so until I graduate. I hope that everyone can cherish their time as a sister, whether little or big, as you never know how it can affect your life.

By Emily Koehne’18, Assistant Editor-in-Chief

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