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Presidential Race Continues to Heat Up

Donald Trump, the current frontrunner for the Republican Party. Photo Credit: Wikipedia

Donald Trump, the current frontrunner for the Republican Party.
Photo Credit: Wikipedia

The race for the White House continued two weekends ago with the South Carolina Primaries and Nevada Caucuses, each producing its own dramatic outcome, as the nation grows closer to picking a new president.

In South Carolina, Republican voters placed their ballots for who they thought would be the best Republican candidate suited for the White House. Donald Trump triumphed in the southern state, wrapping up his second consecutive primary win after his victory in New Hampshire. Trump gained 32.5% of the state’s support, followed by Florida Senator Marco Rubio’s 22.5%, and Texas Senator Ted Cruz’s 22.3%. This accomplishment proves to be a threat towards other candidates, and shows how the billionaire businessman is a clear front-runner in the presidential race.

Hillary Clinton is in the lead against her opponent, Bernie Sanders, for the Democratic nomination. Photo Credit: Biography

Hillary Clinton is in the lead against her opponent, Bernie Sanders, for the Democratic nomination.
Photo Credit: Biography

Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush gained only 7.8% of South Carolina’s support that weekend. The disappointing loss caused Bush to drop out of the race after the primary’s results were released. Bush spoke to supporters at his South Carolina headquarters on Saturday, saying, “The people of Iowa and New Hampshire and South Carolina have spoken, and I really respect their decision.” Despite the politician’s $100 million efforts towards his campaign, famous name, and promise of political civility, his determinations proved to fall short of everyone’s expectations.

In Nevada on Saturday, February 20th, Democratic voters placed their votes in the state’s Caucuses, choosing between either Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders. Despite Sanders’ momentum following his victory in the New Hampshire Primary, the Vermont Senator fell short of former Secretary of State Clinton. Clinton maintained a lead of around 5% ahead of her opponent, and continued to lead in the Democratic South Carolina Primary with 73.5% over Sanders’s 26%.

The race is just heating up, and has proved to produce some unexpected results.

By Margaret Joel ’16, World News Senior Editor

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